Research:

Typography is the art and techniques of arranging type, type design, and modifying type glyphs. Type glyphs are created and modified using a variety of illustration techniques. The arrangement of type involves the selection of typefaces, point size, line length, leading (line spacing), adjusting the spaces between groups of letters (tracking) and adjusting the space between pairs of letters (kerning).

Typography is performed by typesetters, compositors, typographers, graphic designers, art directors, comic book artists, and clerical workers. Until the Digital Age, typography was a specialized occupation. Digitization opened up typography to new generations of visual designers and lay users. (Wikipedia,2008)


Etymology: Typography (from the Greek words τύπος typos = “to strike” “That by which something is symbolized or figured …” and γραφία graphia = to write).

Typography traces its origins to the first punches and dies used to make seals and currency in ancient times. The first known movable type printing artifact is probably the Phaistos Disc, though its real purpose remains disputed. The item dates between 1850 BC and 1600 BC, back to Minoan age and is now on display at the archaeological museum of Herakleion in Crete, Greece.

Typography with movable type was separately invented in 11th-century China. Modular metal type was first invented in KoreaGoryeo Dynasty around 1230. It was independently developed in mid-15th century Europe with the development of specialised techniques for casting and combining cheap copies of letterpunches in the vast quantities required to print multiple copies of texts.


Inspiration:

death_by_typography_by_gcoretypography005

arabic1

arabic2

typography-tree3

typography01

dylan-screenshot-typography


Typography experimentation:

TypoExperiments

The next step ..

The Next Step…

papercliplayout

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